Science Journal of Analytical Chemistry

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Comparisons of Different Digestion Methods for Heavy Metal Analysis from Fruits

Received: 18 January 2024    Accepted: 5 February 2024    Published: 13 March 2024
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Abstract

Fruit juices are produced in home or industrially from horticultural crops by pressing the liquid part. They are rich in sugar, vitamins, and minerals like iron, copper, potassium, folate minerals, and vitamins A, B, and C which are essential for giving the body the nutrients it needs to stay healthy since fruits contain vital mineral components like copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn), which is necessary for human growth and respiration. However, they may have heavy metals which may poison health risk and toxic even the presence is in little amount. Since fruit juices doesn’t pass through different processes, except extracting the liquid from the fruits of vegetables contamination and heavy metals affect human health. Before determination of heavy metals different procedures are applied for analysis. Digestion is the key component for determination of heavy metals from different samples. In this paper we are concerned on wet digestion methods for analysis. Closed system wet digestion is preferred since it lower the risk of contamination. There are different wet digestion types. Some of them are conventional wet digestion, ultraviolet digestion, ultrasound-assisted acid decomposition, conventional heating, microwave-assisted wet digestion etc. From thus, microwave digestion procedure was preferred for the digestion of samples for determination of heavy metals due to its ability to oxidize almost all of the organic samples.

DOI 10.11648/j.sjac.20241201.12
Published in Science Journal of Analytical Chemistry (Volume 12, Issue 1, March 2024)
Page(s) 7-12
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Contamination, Decomposition, Digestion, Fruit Juices, Heavy Metals, Minerals, Wet Digestion

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  • APA Style

    Wale, K. (2024). Comparisons of Different Digestion Methods for Heavy Metal Analysis from Fruits. Science Journal of Analytical Chemistry, 12(1), 7-12. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.sjac.20241201.12

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    ACS Style

    Wale, K. Comparisons of Different Digestion Methods for Heavy Metal Analysis from Fruits. Sci. J. Anal. Chem. 2024, 12(1), 7-12. doi: 10.11648/j.sjac.20241201.12

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    AMA Style

    Wale K. Comparisons of Different Digestion Methods for Heavy Metal Analysis from Fruits. Sci J Anal Chem. 2024;12(1):7-12. doi: 10.11648/j.sjac.20241201.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.sjac.20241201.12,
      author = {Kasahun Wale},
      title = {Comparisons of Different Digestion Methods for Heavy Metal Analysis from Fruits},
      journal = {Science Journal of Analytical Chemistry},
      volume = {12},
      number = {1},
      pages = {7-12},
      doi = {10.11648/j.sjac.20241201.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.sjac.20241201.12},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.sjac.20241201.12},
      abstract = {Fruit juices are produced in home or industrially from horticultural crops by pressing the liquid part. They are rich in sugar, vitamins, and minerals like iron, copper, potassium, folate minerals, and vitamins A, B, and C which are essential for giving the body the nutrients it needs to stay healthy since fruits contain vital mineral components like copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn), which is necessary for human growth and respiration. However, they may have heavy metals which may poison health risk and toxic even the presence is in little amount. Since fruit juices doesn’t pass through different processes, except extracting the liquid from the fruits of vegetables contamination and heavy metals affect human health. Before determination of heavy metals different procedures are applied for analysis. Digestion is the key component for determination of heavy metals from different samples. In this paper we are concerned on wet digestion methods for analysis. Closed system wet digestion is preferred since it lower the risk of contamination. There are different wet digestion types. Some of them are conventional wet digestion, ultraviolet digestion, ultrasound-assisted acid decomposition, conventional heating, microwave-assisted wet digestion etc. From thus, microwave digestion procedure was preferred for the digestion of samples for determination of heavy metals due to its ability to oxidize almost all of the organic samples.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Comparisons of Different Digestion Methods for Heavy Metal Analysis from Fruits
    AU  - Kasahun Wale
    Y1  - 2024/03/13
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    T2  - Science Journal of Analytical Chemistry
    JF  - Science Journal of Analytical Chemistry
    JO  - Science Journal of Analytical Chemistry
    SP  - 7
    EP  - 12
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2376-8053
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.sjac.20241201.12
    AB  - Fruit juices are produced in home or industrially from horticultural crops by pressing the liquid part. They are rich in sugar, vitamins, and minerals like iron, copper, potassium, folate minerals, and vitamins A, B, and C which are essential for giving the body the nutrients it needs to stay healthy since fruits contain vital mineral components like copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn), which is necessary for human growth and respiration. However, they may have heavy metals which may poison health risk and toxic even the presence is in little amount. Since fruit juices doesn’t pass through different processes, except extracting the liquid from the fruits of vegetables contamination and heavy metals affect human health. Before determination of heavy metals different procedures are applied for analysis. Digestion is the key component for determination of heavy metals from different samples. In this paper we are concerned on wet digestion methods for analysis. Closed system wet digestion is preferred since it lower the risk of contamination. There are different wet digestion types. Some of them are conventional wet digestion, ultraviolet digestion, ultrasound-assisted acid decomposition, conventional heating, microwave-assisted wet digestion etc. From thus, microwave digestion procedure was preferred for the digestion of samples for determination of heavy metals due to its ability to oxidize almost all of the organic samples.
    
    VL  - 12
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Food Scinece and Nutrition Research, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Jimma, Ethiopia

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